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canadian film schools - which one????

FIlm and TV Production - I need some help here Anyone who knows anything about Trebas, IAOD, Capilano, Columbia Academy (Vancouver) please feel free to weigh in. I know the basics about all of these places (tuition, program outline, etc.) What I really want to know is; Is it worth it? Will I get a job afterwards? Will I be able to make a film/documentary/commercial on my own afterwards? I am looking for a school that is really hands on, as well. Any information you guys have would be great. Thanks.

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Hey no one (you coulda thought of something better, no?) I have spent many posts on this subject of whether or not film school is worth it, so if you're interested, click on my profile and view my past post history - hunting for the ones about film schools (and specifically Canadian films schools since I'm Toronto based). Some answers: Film is school is worth it if you know nothing/have absolutely no experience in film. It gives you a base of operations and fraternity with peers you probably won't be able to get unless you have some understanding of the industry (meaning - if you've never picked up a camera before, film school is good because you can make all the mistakes you want). Will you get a job afterwards? Not because of film school. I failed Ryerson. Twice. And I have never been asked for a resume or to show a diploma. And I work a lot. Will you be able to make a film afterwards? You can make a film now. If you don't want to spend the money on a degree, by all means go guerilla and shoot your own movie. THE PROBLEM IS (and we don't really address this in these threads all that much) - it's really frickin' hard to make a good short or feature film if you have no experience. So, for every "Pi" or "Curtis's Charm" that is made (and those were both post-film school movies), you get a lot of shite. I admire those filmmakers that grab a camera and just go out and final cut pro a feature together. It also explains why there are a lot of bad movies out there. If you go to film school - don't go for the diploma, and drop out as soon as you know you've gotten as much out of it as you can (unless you really want to get that degree for yourself or your parents - which, really, is a valid reason - but it has nothing to do with filmmaking). Good luck. WPS

The Toronto Film School is wothout question the finest film school in Canada. Students are currently getting their fifth term projects into film festivals around the world, landing jobs in the industry when they graduate, and being properly educated while they are in the college. Merging theory with strong hands on experience, the students here do not talk about making films, they make them.

Neither Toronto Film school or Trebas are good school to go to, ask around and you'll probably get more negative comments then positive. WHERE TO STUDY FILM CANADIAN FILM CENTRE Diploma/degree: None -- advanced training for filmmakers Minimum entrance qualification: Filmmaking experience is essential -- applicants are required to submit their scripts and films and pass a one-on-one interview Tuition: $4,500 for the Alliance/Atlantis resident program Scholarships: Various Length of program: Five months (July-December) Application deadline: Feb. 2 Web site: <www.cdnfilmcentre.com> Famous alumni: Don McKellar (Last Night), Clement Virgo (Love Come Down), Vincenzo Natali (Cube) Enrolment: 250-300 applicants for 28 places (eight writers, producers and directors; four editors) Student/camera ratio: 2:4, with each director shooting four or five films over the five-month program HUMBER COLLEGE Diploma/degree: Diploma Minimum entrance qualification: 75-80 per cent high school average, plus world experience Tuition: $1,600 a year Scholarships: Various Length of program: Three years Application deadline: Feb. 4 Web site: <www.humberc.on.ca> Famous alumni: No household names, but you'd be hard-pressed to find a film shoot or post-production house without a Humber grad Enrolment: 72 students accepted from 2,000 applicants Student/camera ratio: 6:1 ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN Diploma/degree: Diploma Minimum entrance qualification: High school diploma plus review of applicant's portfolio Tuition: $4,323 Scholarships: Various Length of program: Four years (first year is Foundation Studies, then students can move into Integrated Media) Application deadline: March 2 Web site: <www.ocad.on.ca> Famous alumni: Experimental filmmakers Michael Snow, Kika Thorne, Ross McLaren, Wrik Mead, Lynne Fernie; video director Floria Sigismondi Enrolment: 60-70 second-year Integrated Media students RYERSON UNIVERSITY Diploma/degree: Bachelor of Fine Arts Minimum entrance qualification: High school diploma Tuition: $4,000-$5,000 per year Scholarships: Various, including scholarships endowed by Bruce McDonald and Norman Jewison Length of program: Four years Application deadline: Feb. 2 Web site: <www.imagearts.ryerson.ca> Famous alumnus: Bruce McDonald Enrolment: 50 in first year, 200 overall. Over 1,000 hopefuls apply Student/camera ratio: "Fairly high" -- but ratio decreases as students progress since cameras get more expensive SHERIDAN COLLEGE Diploma/degree: Diploma Minimum entrance qualification: High school diploma plus world experience Tuition: approx. $4,500 per year Scholarships: Various Length of program: Three years, plus one-year post-grad program; Sheridan also offers a shared degree program with York Application deadline: Early March Web site: <www.sheridanc.on.ca> Famous alumni: Gemini Award-winning sound editors Stephen Barden, Craig Hennigan and Jill Purdy; experimental filmmakers Mike Hoolboom and Phil Hoffman Enrolment: 65 accepted from 1,600 applicants TORONTO FILM SCHOOL Diploma/degree: Diploma (full-time placements only) Minimum entrance qualification: Students are considered on their own merits -- portfolio, motivation, etc. Tuition: $17,800 Scholarships: One $500 cash award Length of program: 50 weeks (full-time) Application deadline: Any time up to the start of each course in October, January, April or July Web site: <www.iaod.com> Famous alumni: Program only started two years ago, "but Danny DeVito has stopped by" Enrolment: 15 (increases to 30 in April) Student/camera ratio: 4:1, but as program progresses, ratios may go down TREBAS INSTITUTE Diploma/degree: Diploma (full-time placements only); two film/TV programs: production and post-production Minimum entrance qualification: High school diploma, plus entry exam Tuition: $12,900 Scholarships: Only upon graduation, to top student (up to $3,000) Length of program: Nine months (full-time) Application deadline: Four weeks prior to start dates in January, April, July, October Web site: <www.trebas.com> Enrolment: 20 students accepted from 60 applicants Student/camera ratio: 20:8 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO Diploma/degree: Bachelor of Arts (Film Studies) Minimum entrance qualification: High school graduating average above 80 per cent; students apply to Humanities/Arts & Science, then, having achieved 70 per cent or more, take the film program in second year Tuition: $1,000 per course (typical courseload is four to five courses) Scholarships: Various Length of program: Four years (Specialist) or three years (Major) Application deadline: March 1 Web site: <www.utoronto.ca/cinema> Famous alumni: Atom Egoyan took three or four courses here, as did Grass director Ron Mann Student/camera ratio: No cameras -- the course is strictly theory, criticism, history YORK UNIVERSITY Diploma/degree: Bachelor of Arts Minimum entrance qualification: High school average of at least 80 per cent, plus portfolio, work experience, etc. Tuition: $1,000 per course (typical courseload is four to five courses) Scholarships: Various Length of program: Four years Application deadline: March 15 Web site: <www.yorku.ca> Famous alumni: Cinematographers Mark Irwin (There's Something About Mary, Twister) and Paul Sarossy (The Sweet Hereafter, Exotica); Rhombus Media, one of Canada's top production houses, was founded here in 1979 Enrolment: 60 accepted into first year; 250 enrolled over the four-year program Student/camera ratio: Different types of cameras used (e.g., Super 8, 16mm) mean the ratio changes throughout the program. http://www.eye.net/eye/issue/issue_03.22.01/plus/eg-film.html

but truthful the best way to get things accomplished is by doing them yourself, mess around with some programs,photoshop,aftereff, premiere..get a DV cam, and do some messing around with it

IOADs The Toronto FIlm School is amazing, for the price of tuition you cant make a movie that cheap, but If you go to the Toronto Film School, you make many films and learn how to make them properly. take my word for it, I'm currently attending classes there

I have to admit that I'm not familiar with the Toronto Film School other than ads on the TV. I'm going to Sheridan College in the Fall which I understand to have a very good reputation. I guess my concern is that places like Trebas, Toronto Film School and IAOD will take any one as long as they have the money to pay for the course where as colleges and University do have a competitive edge to get in.

I have to admit that I'm not familiar with the Toronto Film School other than ads on the TV. I'm going to Sheridan College in the Fall which I understand to have a very good reputation. I guess my concern is that places like Trebas, Toronto Film School and IAOD will take any one as long as they have the money to pay for the course where as colleges and University do have a competitive edge to get in.

I have to admit that I'm not familiar with the Toronto Film School other than ads on the TV. I'm going to Sheridan College in the Fall which I understand to have a very good reputation. I guess my concern is that places like Trebas, Toronto Film School and IAOD will take any one as long as they have the money to pay for the course where as colleges and University do have a competitive edge to get in.

I have to admit that I'm not familiar with the Toronto Film School other than ads on the TV. I'm going to Sheridan College in the Fall which I understand to have a very good reputation. I guess my concern is that places like Trebas, Toronto Film School and IAOD will take any one as long as they have the money to pay for the course where as colleges and University do have a competitive edge to get in.

I can't decide on which university to head to...I've been considering uft , sheridan or toronto film school....but I was thinking of going somewhere a bit farther from home... my options are guelph, western, Sheridan, Ottawa or queens (which I think i'm unlikely getting into queens! Both my siblings had gone to western ontario university for different fields...but I'm nbot sure if its for me! Could anyone help me with this problem?

In my opinion and i'm sure many will agree, Capilano is by far the best program. First year will direct towards being a P.A and second year will help you realise above the line positions, I think any professionnal would agree that when it comes to film studies no school can offer a job when you get out, but when you look who's working and who's developping or even producing projects it seems like Capilano is on top, not to forget that it's a lower version of a very steep tuition cost for such field of study. Frenchy

If you're looking to find out more about any of the programs in Van... check out http://www.artschoolreviews.ca.

There's way more in depth info from students who've graduated from there.

Here's a Cap Film Program review.

http://www.artschoolreviews.ca/reviews/capilano-university/motion-pictur...