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Comical gore effects...!

I've been writing a screenplay of late that calls for some comical blood and gore effects. Think over the top, somewhat realistic stuff like in "Monty Python & The Holy Grail" and "Kung Fu Hustle". Ok, Monty Python's isn't realistic, but you get the idea. So - I was wondering if I could get some technical advice on HOW to pull this off. This is pretty much an amatuer, no-budget movie, so anything costing over $50 is out. Here are the two effects I need to pull off - 1.) The Monty-Python blood spray - There are several scenes in which characters are de-limbed, and I pictured them flying off and spraying blood like in the battle with the Black Knight. I have some fake limbs from the usual Halloween stores, and I have planned on making them fall off by pulling them off with fishing wire. However, I have no idea on how to make the blood spray out after the limb comes off. 2.) The "Coughing Up Blood" effect - I have a scene in which a character is lying on his back and coughs up blood, like in "Jaws" (but of course it doesn't have to be as realistic). I have some recepies for edible fake blood, but how do you make it look like the character has coughed it up without swallowing half of it? Thanks for all input!

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For a good spray effect use tubing connected to an air compressor. Even standard auqarium tubing and a Hudson Sprayer with work really well.For a good spray effect use tubing connected to an air compressor. Even standard auqarium tubing and a Hudson Sprayer with work really well. Years ago I found two water fire extinguishers at a thrift store. You can unscrew the top, fill it with your blood mixture and then pressurize it at a gas station air pump. Huge, long, powerful sprays of blood. For the blood in the mouth gag there really is no trick - the actor is just going to have to practce not swallowing have the blood mixture in his mouth.

Edible Blood: 1. Karo or Light Corn Syrup 2. Red Kool-aid mix 3. Chocolate powder Experiment with the mixture until you get a color you like. It's edible, yet disgustingly sweet. Ditto to the sprayers. Almost anything that will spray water will spray fake blood. --Trey

For the fire extinguisher method, would I have to use a watered down blood mixture (aka just red water), or could I still use thicker blood mixtures?

filmsparK wrote:
For the fire extinguisher method, would I have to use a watered down blood mixture (aka just red water), or could I still use thicker blood mixtures?
You can use the standard corn syrup based mixture.

Great, thanks!

Put a bit of instant coffee in it to give it clots.

directorik wrote:
For a good spray effect use tubing connected to an air compressor. Even standard auqarium tubing and a Hudson Sprayer with work really well.For a good spray effect use tubing connected to an air compressor. Even standard auqarium tubing and a Hudson Sprayer with work really well. Years ago I found two water fire extinguishers at a thrift store. You can unscrew the top, fill it with your blood mixture and then pressurize it at a gas station air pump. Huge, long, powerful sprays of blood. For the blood in the mouth gag there really is no trick - the actor is just going to have to practce not swallowing have the blood mixture in his mouth.
please excuse my ignorance but what exactly is a water fire extinguisher? is that some sort of special extinguisher or is the same as the red ones you see everywhere. also where would one get an air compressor?

A water fire extinguisher is one that uses water rather than Co2, foam, Halon or a dry chemical like sodium bicarbonate. Typically the red canisters you see are either a foam or dry chemical. Water extinguishers are silver.

Would you be able to put only a moderate amt. of pressure into the water extinguishers? I want a big spray, but the ones I've seen advertise sprays of 40ft, and that would probably end up soaking the camera and crew.

Experiment. Use water and full pressure without a crew present. Squeeze it full and see what happens - squeeze it half and see what happens - squeeze it lightly and see what happens. The try it with the blood mixture. Then thin the mixture to thicken it and do a few more experiments. That way when you are on set with the camera and crew you will have a better idea of where to place them. It never hurts to have drop cloths on set when you're doing blood scenes. Cover crew and equipment, tape up the vulnerable openings in the camera and have clean, hot water standing by. If you get some of the blood on the lens, clean it off with away.